Store Cupboard Challenge ~ Day 5

The butter situation is getting a bit desperate. There is enough for our toast for the next three mornings but I may have to think of something other than sandwiches for Monday's lunches and there is not enough for baking or pudding-making this weekend.

Puddings this weekend will have to be butterless. I have quite a lot of eggs still and plenty of raspberries so I may find a raspberry mousse recipe.

The milk situation is also not great. There's enough for drinking but if I want it for cooking I shall have to use dried milk. In fact I used some this evening for our supper.

Tonight's supper




Tonight we had an old favourite from Jocasta Innes' super book The Pauper's Cookbook. Potato, bacon and onion hotpot is filling, cheap, easy to make and delicious. It is simply thinly, sliced potatoes, sliced onions and bacon or ham layered in a casserole and covered with white sauce. I used reconstituted dried milk to make my sauce. The sauce can have cheese added if you like. I pour half the sauce in when my dish is half full and then the rest when it is full. This ensures the sauce is well distributed throughout the hotpot.

Allow a good sized spud and a  medium onion per person. Use as much bacon or ham as you can spare, or leave out the meat and put sliced cheese in between the layers of potato and onion.

Bake your hotpot for one hour covered at 200°c (180°c fan oven), then take off the cover and lower the temperature to 180°c (160°c fan oven) and bake for another hour.

I used the meat from this cooked ham hock. It's been in the freezer for a while. It isn't very big and weighs about 500g.


I cut the meat off the bone. I shall use the bone plus some of the meat to make soup tomorrow with beans and barley.



Friday baking

I usually bake something nice on a Friday to mark the end of a hard week of studying and work. Bearing in mind the butter situation I opted for muffins which I can make with sunflower oil. Using up four bruised apples I made these wholesome  muffins which have yogurt, oats, sunflower seeds as well as the apples. They taste similar to my apple cake and are lovely and moist. I made 24 and put half in the freezer.




Comments

  1. I am hungry now that I have seen that hotpot, it is just the kind of thing I like to eat.

    If I ever run short of butter I use ketchup or mustard to spread on the bread. My Maltese friend dips the bread in olive oil, one side only.

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  2. Is it still a well-kept secret that Waitrose is cheaper than Tesco? I got an enormous end of a ham there recently for £2 which kept me going in sandwiches and suppers until I was sick of the sight of it.

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    1. That doesn't surprise me Mary. I'm so sick of the 'posh' tag as well.

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  3. I shop in Waitrose because it's our closest supermarket. In my experience Tesco is only cheaper if you buy value everything - which has its place but in reality it isn't the way I shop a lot of the time. And now Ocado and waitrose are price matching Tesco and Sainsburys ...

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  4. The ham looks delish. Are your kids grumbling yet about 'another bloody blog project'? ha ha. It's a good'un though. So wrong that you don't have your fair share of cooking disasters methinks. Your muffins look like muffins and not bath sponges and your flapjacks... don't even get me started on them. Sniff.

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  5. I am so enjoying this 'Store Cupboard Challenge'. Maybe even more than 'Not Camping'. I also took a look at your 'War Time' thread. Brilliant. Could you recommend one book to get me started with 'War time' cooking? :)

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    1. We'll Eat Again by national treasure Marguerite Patten. She has written two others -The Victory Cookbook and The Post-War Cookbook (rationsing went on until 1954).

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  6. I wish waitrose would come 'oop north' - I shop there when we stay nr Henley in the summer (sounds quite posh - lol - but not really!!) I am always impressed with their selection and I dont find it that expensive - I did laugh at the post in the paper the other day about the comments they were getting on either twitter or facebook about why people shop there - so funny xx Like the sound of your hot pot - will make a nice change from Pinacletee xx

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    1. Pinacletee -is that the same as pan haggerty and paneckelty? Taters and cheese?

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  7. Possibly - layer of corned beef, thinly sliced onion and thinly sliced potato - repeat then cover with beef stock and then pop in oven about 220 for about an hour and I tend to serve with peas/carrots and crusty bread x

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    1. Not pan haggerty then as that is just potatoes, cheese and onions (from the North East).I googled panackelty and got this. It seems there are many spellings. I think there must be many variations too, probably throughout northern Europe on a dish of slow cooked spuds and meat.

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  8. Last week the head of our local supermarket, Edwin Booth remarked in an article in The Times " We do not focus on people who sit down to a microwave meal on a Saturday night in front of the television " that sort of comment does nothing to help the hate campaign against people who would rather spend a good proportion of their dwindling incomes on good food.

    Well done for doing this challenge Sue you are showing that feeding a family well takes time and effort, both of which are free.

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  9. That hot pot sounds delicious and I will be trying it.

    Have you got room in the garden for a cow? Jx

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  10. After reading this and previous Store Cupboard Challenge, I was so inspired that my husband and I went through all our food cupboards and fridge. Washed all the shelves, sorted and organized. Love your potato recipe and hope to make it tonight. Thank you so much.

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  11. I've been making that Jocasta Innes' recipe since I was given a copy of her book when I was first married. It is amazingly delicious but needs to have the oven on for a long time. I experimented with trying various ways of shortening the cooking time and therefore using less gas but it just didn't taste the same. I now just stick to the original timings.

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    1. It does take a long time to cook. I must try it using cooked potatoes, but maybe the onions would need a little pre-cooking too.

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  12. Anonymous9:55 pm BST

    I use dried milk powder in cooking all the time . Here in NZ its cheaper than fresh . ( crazy I know )
    It makes great custard as well as white sauce.
    I have also found that if you make it up then add it in equal quantities to fresh milk ,i.e. 1 cup fresh plus 1 cup reconstituted, then put in the fridge, after about half an hour it tastes the same as fresh and the kids dont mind drinking it . Great to help the shopping go further . cheers Deb in NZ

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    1. It's cheaper here too Deb. I put a couple of tablespoons in my yogurt to make it thicker and I sometimes eke out a carton of whole milk with reconstituted dried milk too.

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    2. Anonymous1:17 am BST

      great minds think alike :)

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  13. Sue, I've been keenly following your progress during the thrifty cooking days. Your recipes and photographs of the results always just inspire me...and also really increase my appetite!

    You've come up with so many smart ideas, and I know that I will borrow some of them. With my tiny NYC kitchen, there's not much space to store staples, though I do try to do the best I can. I'm so lucky to have many available sources of fresh, seasonal produce, but also to have many good grocery shops that are open early and late to satisfy the appetites and work schedules of this city that never sleeps. (We do sleep, but it's great to do so on a somewhat full and nourished stomach!)

    When I think about budgeting meals week to week, I always have to factor in just how much time I will have to economize in kitchen preparations, versus the cost of cutting corners. It's fun to try to meet this challenge.

    Unlike many New Yorkers, I never, never order take out food. Even after a long day at work, I find preparing a meal very relaxing and creative...a way to east back into My time.

    Thanks again for your inspiring suggestions. xo

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  14. I never out butter on sarnies - however if you think your lot would miss it how about mayo?- can't remember if you have a spare egg but if you do its easy to who up with a hand blender

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    1. Thanks Rachel, I still have plenty of eggs and I also have mayo so the butter shortage won't really be a problem.

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  15. Mmmm, ham hocks are so good aren't they? Mr TH uses olive oil instead of butter- he claims it's much nicer (not good on sarnies though!)

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    1. Or for crumbles, pastry etc! I use olive oil for most of my frying/sauteeing but it's the baking I like butter for.

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  16. Anonymous10:41 am BST

    Don't eat bacon.
    Just an advice..

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    1. Thank you for you advice but I will not be taking it.

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  17. Hi Sue

    Those apple muffins with yoghurt oats and sunflower seeds look lovely - and apple cake is one of my favourites. Is the recipe on your blog? If not would you mind sharing it with us?

    Thanks.

    Susan

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