Rhubarb Crumble

Monday, 20 January 2014

Rhubarb (beautiful forced English rhubarb from Evesham), ginger and cream, three ingredients which suggested several delicious possibilities for our weekend pudding. Fool, trifle, ice cream, mousse, cheesecake. I considered all of these, briefly. But there was never really any question, it was always going to be crumble. Crumble is the best thing to do with rhubarb whatever the annoying celebrity chefs tell you. Simple, straightforward and no twists whatsoever. New ideas are all very well but only if there is something wrong with the old ideas.


Rhubarb, chopped and tossed in sugar and little ground ginger.
In a baking dish.


Crumble - 8 oz plain flour with 3-4 oz butter rubbed in until it resembles breadcrumbs.
Stir in 3-4 oz soft brown sugar (or whatever sugar you have) and a bit more ground ginger if you like.
Tip over the rhubarb, bake for 30 -40 minutes at 190°c (170°fan oven).

Serve with the cream. Or custard.
Much less trouble to make than this and frankly nicer.


Works for any fruit but particularly fruit that grows well in England -apples, pears, plums, damsons, blackberries, raspberries, currants, quinces. Harder fruit (ie quinces) need cooking first.
That said bananas are good addition to an apple and mincemeat crumble in winter and tinned peaches are quite good in a crumble especially with raspberries. You can of course add nuts, oats and ground almonds to the crumble.

This is the last of my ingredients posts following on from this post. There might be more in the future but not four in quick succession. Photographing and writing about what you ate everyday, even for just four days is hard work and rapidly becomes a chore. Thank you though for your lovely comments, I hope my recipe ideas are helpful.

23 comments:

  1. Yum yum! Can't beat a crumble especially rhubarb but we only have our own green which requires more sweetening:(

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  2. I love rhubarb and ginger, it is a classic combination, for a very good reason, and as you say, if it ain't broke, don't fix it hey! Crumble is lovely with custard, but I never think of cream! Scrummy. Your recent foodie posts have been lovely Sue, a real pleasure to read and be inspired by. Thank you. xx

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  3. my tummy rumbles all the time I read your posts. I wish you were my mum! Thank you as always for lovely, informative, useful posts. Maybe one day, when my baby bears are out of the fussy pre-school years they might appreciate some home cooking a la quince tree!

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  4. I am now salivating and wondering where I might find rhubarb. Thank you Sue, it looks gorgeous.

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  5. My mouth is watering - I'll have to get some Rhubarb as I love it as crumble - great post - thank you!

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  6. Wow Sue! I go away for a few days and come back to find all these gorgeous food ideas and recipes! You are inspired - and inspiring! I'm sitting here with a coffee having dusted off my cook books, looking through them to decide on this week's meals. Thanks for the idea!

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  7. Anonymous3:10 pm GMT

    that looks lovely i like to add some oats to the topping and lovel blackberry and apple but your rhubarb looks very pleasant

    tessa

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  8. I should really look this up, but I'm wondering what the difference is between a crisp and a crumble. In the US, I think we call dishes like this "crisps" but we often add oats to the topping. Maybe it's the oats, and the way that bake, that makes the difference. This looks delicious. I have only tried rhubarb a few times and I like it a lot.

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  9. Rhubarb is wonderful, isn't it? I still have some (stewed) in the freezer from last year, and the plant in the garden is definitely starting to poke its head up above the earth.
    Beautiful colour. I agree, crumble is the best - although stewed it makes a nice change to apple in a cake made with ground almonds.
    I'd struggle to choose between cream or custard...

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  10. Yes, very helpful recipes and ideas - thanks so much.
    Possibly my favourite pud.

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  11. "New ideas are all very well, but only if there is something wrong with the old ideas." Wise words, indeed, Sue.

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  12. Lovely Sue. I make loads of crumbles with various allotment fruit - rhubarb, gooseberries, blackcurrants, tayberries, raspberries, apples, pears etc. etc. So very quick and easy, it's the thing I make when I only have ten minutes.

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  13. Oh Sue - you do tempt my taste buds. Rhubarb and crumble with real vanilla custard...I remember swirling it round in my bowl when I was young - much to my grandmother's annoyance.

    Nina x

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  14. We've got some rhubarb in the fridge - now I've got too many ideas for what to do with it. I love rhubarb at this time of year. It's such a beautiful colour! x

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  15. Anonymous2:17 am GMT

    I do love rhubarb, and this crumble looks wonderful. Thanks for all your hard work on the recent food posts. Loved them.

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  16. Oh my goodnes! That looks amazing! Now I am yearning for rhubarb. Our neighbour used to grow it in his garden in the UK but I have never seen it here in Israel :(

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  17. Oh good, nearly rhubarb time. I happen to have some meringues in a tin, so could probably use them up in a Rhubarb Mess. I have been trying to comment for a few posts but pushing publish has not been working. Here goes.

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  18. Oh yum!!! That looks delicious! I can recommend adding pieces of stem ginger in a rhubarb crumble. I did this once as I had no ground ginger. It was really scrummy! Now I'm off to buy some rhubarb!

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  19. Anonymous2:52 am GMT

    You are fantastic! You take normal everyday cooking to a new level of creativity and practicality.

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  20. Your food looks delicious and reminds me of my own cooking. I don't follow recipes, just throw together what I have and what needs using up. I can recommend scattering some seeds (pumpkin, sunflower) or nuts (almonds/pecans) or any sort of combination on the top of crumble before it goes in the oven. It is a great way to add seeds to your diet if, like me, you find it boring to munch them on their own. The crumble topping becomes lovely and nutty and crunchy.

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  21. Yummo - love the addition of the ground ginger,

    Michelle (another 1965-er)

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  22. Lovely - I adore rhubarb crumble. I've never got on with adding oats to it as many people do, but Hugh Fearlessly-Eatsitall uses oatmeal in his recipe, which is absolutely wonderful, as it stays crunchy in just the right way.

    An inspiring post. Tomorrow I shall plod up the quagmire and see what my rhubarb plant is up to.....

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  23. this sounds delish.

    I never get rhubarb in my box...

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